May 27, 2020

Human beings have the capacity to deal with and benefit from hugely challenging situations. A question that we now face is - how do we want to live our lives post this pandemic. What do we want our lives to look like let’s say 12 months from today? Most people I speak to strongly feel that they don’t want to just go back to the pre-pandemic days. I am very fortunate these days to be able to offer coaching to NHS key workers. Many of them are continuously facing adversity on a daily basis but I was just struck when one of them said to me - “why waste this distressing experience on just getting back to who I was?”

Research has shown that an estimate of about three-fourths of adults is exposed to at least one traumatic event in their lives. While trauma can lead to suffering and a host of psychological issues like anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, depression and other mental health disorders, there is also equal empirical evidence and studies that show that positive personal transfor...

May 18, 2020

Last year, I started watching a TV series on Prime Video called New Amsterdam, a story that revolves around a public hospital in New York City. I am more of a crime drama/thriller type person and this series honestly didn’t feel like a fit, yet somehow I got hooked onto it. The main character of New Amsterdam, is the medical director of the hospital Dr Max Goodwin who is the kindest person I’ve ever seen, well at least on TV! His punch line is “how can I help?” Of course, keeping in mind that this is TV drama, I’m still hooked episode after episode and I think the reason is I’m in awe of the message the series depicts – Kindness Counts. Whilst crime thrillers still keep me on the edge of my couch and pumps my adrenaline, New Amsterdam shows me that we need to make the world a kinder place through good deeds, favours and helping others. And, that perhaps is the best message in this pandemic era.  

This week (18th – 24th May) is Mental Health Awareness Week in the U.K. and the theme...

May 5, 2020

Over the past couple of months, we have all been sheltered at home – businesses and schools closed, cafes, pubs, restaurants shut and most people working and communicating digitally in these unprecedented times. At the moment, I seem to be going from sessions on Zoom to meetings on Teams and then I’m back on Zoom again! My coaching sessions, lectures and personal time with friends are all online. Honestly, as I write this, the next few months seem quite unknown too. What’s going to happen with the virus, the economy, what will be the new rules and regulations, will kids go back to school? Well, like you, I just don’t know.

So if there is so much uncertainty around us, is there even any point in setting goals now? My answer is yes. We may not have any control over the pandemic but we have absolute power in choosing the way we live over the next three months despite all the uncertainty that surrounds us. “I’m so stuck” – this is a phrase I hear constantly amongst my clients, classmates an...

April 28, 2020

Highly challenging situations can no doubt cause a wide range of psychological and physiological responses in human beings. The American Psychological Association (APA) defines trauma as an emotional response, pain and shock caused by an extremely upsetting situation. As the COVID-19 pandemic spreads across the world, it’s important for us to recognise that at this time of crisis, the trauma experienced can lead to mental health challenges for many. Some are affected directly – being exposed to the virus itself, losing a loved one to the disease, a job loss or indirect consequences like witnessing chaos in the global economy. Like most of you out there, I too had coronavirus affect me directly, firstly having been exposed to the virus itself in early March. The classic symptoms – fever, shortness of breath and fatigue, but like 80% of those affected by the disease, my symptoms were relatively moderate and I was fortunate to recover swiftly on my own. As a family too, we’ve had to incur...

April 21, 2020

As I write this piece, we are in Week 5 of the lockdown in the U.K. with absolutely no clue as to when things will ease. Will life get back to normal in another 3 weeks or will it be 3 months? And what really is normal anymore? We all have too many questions and no answers to any. One of the things that have kept me grounded during this lockdown is the ability to continue my coaching work. And as I reflected yesterday after a session I was so struck by just how priorities have shifted across all my clients - a complete re-alignment of goals. Just in the past 4 weeks, goals have moved to include health, emotions, relationships and the most important one – managing physical and emotional space.

So, today I want to focus on this common theme that comes up in my sessions – boundaries. If we are to be home almost 24/7 with all members of our family, how can we set up a viable space when there currently is no start/stop between work/home/school? If home was a space to come back to, then what...

April 6, 2020

There’s no doubt that these are unprecedented times and so many of us are feeling incredibly overwhelmed by situations out of our control. I read on CNN the other day that a quarter of the world’s population is in some form of a lockdown and as I write this, there seems to be no end in sight to our collective crisis. We have so many questions and no answers to any. When will the lockdown end? Am I at risk of getting Covid-19? Will my family be safe? Will the economy recover? Will my business shut down? When will schools reopen? Like most of you, I don’t have answers to any of these questions. So how can we find some calm in these chaotic times?

Focus on what you have control over. Although we can’t control a lot of what’s going we still can take charge of a few things. For instance, setting a routine to follow at least on weekdays can be productive. Personally, I’ve found this really useful. For a good 6 hours of my day I work like nothing has changed. My medium has no doubt shifted to...

March 24, 2020

How are you doing? A question we would not think twice about answering in the past has now become such a deep and loaded question. And when I mean past, I mean two weeks ago. So much has changed for so many of us in such a short period of time that I can’t even get my mind around it all. Where do I even start? From toilet rolls and essentials flying off shelves, to school closures, mandatory work-from home measures, social distancing and National exam cancellations, perhaps for all of us the worst is still yet to come? We will probably see a rise in Covid-19 cases, higher death tolls, stricter distancing measures, mandatory lockdowns and a massive slowdown to our economy that will take forever to recover. Life as we know it has changed and what should we do?

A couple of weeks ago, I thought I had the answers to this. I thought this is simple – I’ve experienced childhood trauma, survived 9/11, battled Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and changed my life around helping people in the mental h...

June 12, 2019

My academic paper submitted as part of Module 1 for my MSc. Programme in Applied Positive Psychology and Coaching Psychology. (Appendices not published). Copyright: Poornima Nair. Please do not replicate.

Introduction:

My first positive psychology intervention (PPI) was Mindfulness-based meditation, part of an 8-week Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) programme (Kabat-Zinn, 2003) with an MBSR trained instructor in 2015. I was introduced to instruction-led mindfulness meditation and gentle movement meditations. After completing the programme, I continued to practice mindfulness meditation five times a week, and I have since found an increased sense of wellbeing (Brown & Ryan, 2003). In the same year, I included the PPI of exercise into my regime, a structured programme that includes a combination of running and strength training five times a week. This has improved my mental and physical fitness, enhanced my psychological and general wellbeing and boosted my body image, self-esteem...

May 14, 2019

I am so pleased to be back here on my blog and write a post for the very first time this year. Ever since I started my Masters in Applied Positive Psychology and Coaching Psychology (MAPPCP) I haven’t had much time to do much else other than focus on the program itself which was a combination of lectures, course work, reading journal papers and core texts, research and my assessment itself which is a portfolio on positive psychology interventions. My first module is over and I’m so pleased with the learning and all that I have absorbed in this academic process. So I am here today because I would want to share some of the wisdom.

So first, what is positive psychology? For the uninitiated, positive psychology is a relatively new movement. Martin Seligman is the founder of positive psychology and is a leading authority in this field. Seligman's work researching learned pessimistic attitudes eventually led him to develop an interest in optimism, an interest that would eventually lead to the...

February 9, 2019

Years ago, when my parents went to the doctor for their second or third pregnancy scan, the doctor didn’t see any organs yet, which was surprising at the time. But the next day, the doctor saw me happy and healthy. My parents were then asked if they wanted to know the sex of their child. Both of them secretly wanted a girl in their life, especially my mother. They held each other’s hand and said, ‘yes’. Soon they had this pervasive feeling that everything, absolutely everything was as magical and amazing as it should be, that their lives were complete. I am a single child by choice, my parents didn’t need another, and because of that, all the attention is on me. Today I’m gonna talk all about being a single child; there’s a lot to it. 

Growing up as an only child, you tend to get a lot of curious questions and comments from people who are fascinated by the concept of a life without siblings. From the stereotypical “You must be really spoiled” to my frequent favourite, “What’s it like to...

Please reload

All content on this website, including medical opinion and any other health-related information, is for informational purposes only and should not be considered to be a specific diagnosis or treatment plan for any individual situation. Always seek the direct advice of your own doctor in connection with any questions or issues you may have regarding your own health or the health of others.

© 2023 by Personal Life Coach. Proudly created with Wix.com